Christophe Gaeta

Christophe Gueta is a scenographer specialized in designing museums and developing exhibits. He has collaborated with U.S. Embassy on several occasions. By recounting history Christophe tries to help the general public, and especially youth, become more aware of the importance of remembering and safeguarding our democratic values.

About Christophe “try to put themselves in the shoes of those who have experienced these events.”

I am Christophe Guetta. I am a scenographer, specialized in designing museums and developing exhibits. I’ve developed many projects and exhibits mainly on different aspects of commemorating the First and Second World War. I’ve collaborated with U.S. Embassy in Brussels on several occasions to help the general public, and especially youth, become more aware of the importance of safeguarding our democratic values.

In my job as a scenographer, I have to deal with many subjects, in my case mainly historical subjects. Every time I work on a topic related to the First World War or another conflict, I realize that most people have very little knowledge about history. Exhibitions or installations like this, help the younger generation to visualize what happened. It’s never 100% complete but it sparks their interest in these topics.

Another ting I try to achieve with my projects, whether it’s an exhibit, an installation or an exhibition, is to get young people to identify with what is being explained. We sometimes use small artifacts, audiovisual productions, or a particular object so young people are attracted and try to put themselves in the shoes of those who have experienced these events. I am convinced that is fundamental.

 

it’s a way to foster my kinship to the United States

For years, I have been working on historical projects and since 2006 I’ve been collaborating with the U.S. Embassy in Brussels. I’ve had the pleasure of working together on exhibitions, film productions and movies road shows. We also created a multiple screens spectacle that traveled in a road show to several venues around the country. It’s been a real pleasure to work together with the embassy especially because of this personal bond and admiration I’ve always had for the United States of America.

The first big trip I made to the United States was when I was 9 years old. We went to New York and ever since I keep going back regularly.Whenever I leave the U.S. after one of my trips, I can’t help but think to myself that I’ll be back soon.

Working with the Embassy on projects that showcase the link(s) between Belgium, Europe and the United States is another way to travel. It’s like traveling back in time. And it’s a way to foster my kinship to the United States.

What I would like to change in society, at least on my scale, is for people, especially young people, to become more aware of the importance of safeguarding our democratic values. I am convinced of this once again by the many projects on the Second World War and the First World War I’ve worked on. 

Collaborating on these projects I unfortunately sometimes draw parallels with what is happening in some places in Europe right now. I realize that living in a democratic society somehow puts citizens to sleep. People start taking things for granted and they forget that these democratic values must be permanently safeguarded. We must be vigilant.

I try to do my part by raising awareness among young people. They hold the key, but we have the duty to explain to them, but if they understand these things, I have full confidence in their ability to safeguard our democratic values at every level.

We need to talk about these conflicts again

If we see what’s happening particularly in Europe, we need to talk about these conflicts again. Not that long ago Europe experienced the Second World War. It’s really not all that long ago at all. Organizing commemorative events is always helpful. It’s good to look back, and explain the consequences of what happened.

“It’s good to look back, and explain the consequences of what happened.”

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